tractionism:

Over the last week or so in Australia a boy with dark skin was threatened with beheading, a woman had her head smashed against a wall and was thrown off a train, mosques and cars have been vandalised, people are being abused in the street and social media is littered with hate speech and vile comments. Kind of interesting considering most of these people justify their attacks by linking Islam to terrorism and proclaiming it’s a hateful religion from violent countries. 

bisexualsaregreat:

aaawunder:

whenever someone says “bi means two so *biphobe noises*.” i like to imagine them biting into a jellyfish and being remarkably surprised to find they are neither made of jelly nor fish

This is the best thing I’ve read all day.

harrypotterconfessions:

inksplattersandearlyhours:

I think one of the reasons the Harry Potter Epilogue was so poorly received was because the audience was primarily made up of the Millennial generation.

We’ve walked with Harry, Ron and Hermione, through a world that we thought was great but slowly revealed itself to be the opposite. We unpeeled the layers of corruption within the government, we saw cruelty against minorities grow in the past decades, and had media attack us and had teachers tell us that we ‘must not tell lies’. We got angry and frustrated and, like Harry, Ron and Hermione, had to think of a way to fight back. And them winning? That would have been enough to give us hope and leave us satisfied.

But instead. There was skip scene. And suddenly they were all over 30 and happy with their 2.5 children.

And the Millennials were left flailing in the dust.

Because while we recognised and empathised with everything up to that point. But seeing the Golden Trio financially stable and content and married? That was not something our generation could recognise. Because we have no idea if we’re ever going to be able to reach that stage. Not with the world we’re living in right now.

Having Harry, Ron and Hermione stare off into the distance after the battle and wonder about what the future might be would have stuck with us. Hell, have them move into a shitty flat together and try and sort out their lives would have. Have them with screaming nightmares and failed relationships and trying to get jobs in a society that’s falling apart would have. Have them still trying to fix things in that society would have. Because we known Voldemort was just a symptom of the disease of prejudice the Wizarding World.

But don’t push us off with an ‘all was well’. In a world about magic, JK Rowling finally broke our suspension of disbelief by having them all hit middle-class and middle-age contentment and expecting a fanbase of teenagers to accept it.

Also. Since when was ‘don’t worry kids, you’re going to turn out just like your parents’ ever a happy ending? Does our generation even recognise marriage and money and jobs as the fulfillment of life anymore? Does our generation even recognise the Epilogue’s Golden Trio anymore?

i’m not saying this is for everyone, but it sure as hell is for me.

"When it comes to sex, feminists get a bad (and confusing) rep. We’re both man-haters and whores, unmarryable spinsters and family-destroyers. We purportedly want to outlaw pornography while encouraging adolescent girls to get on the pill. We’re hideous hairy-legged lesbians, and we’re using undergraduate Women’s Studies programs to turn your daughter bisexual. We’re promiscuous oversexed sluts, and we’re angry femi-Nazis because we’re not getting laid.

Critics can’t decide if feminists hate sex or are having too much of it.”

Jill Filipovic for the Guardian

Watch out guys, Australian Men’s Health magazine says feminism is making women bad in bed.

(via micdotcom)
"

Intersex people are not rare, just invisible.

Unfortunately, there’s a lot of shame and secrecy within our communities, perpetuating the invisibility. I’ve had doctors tell me over and over again that I’d never meet anyone else like me. (Thankfully, that was not the case.) So many intersex people like me have been instructed by our doctors, parents, and friends not to tell anyone about our conditions, which makes us feel shameful and unworthy.

I’ve been poked, prodded, and gawked at by so many doctors, it’s enough to make anyone feel like a science experiment. They say how excited they are to meet someone like you, they’ll “never meet another person like this, ever.” But when they say that to you as a kid, all you hear is “you’re a freak.”

Emily Quinn, “I’m Emily Quinn and I’m Intersex

This is an awesome article and you are amazing for sharing your story!

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